Thursday, May 19, 2022

Stargazer by Laurie Petrou

It's a fine line between admiration and envy. Diana Martin has lived her life in the shadow of her sadistic older brother. She quietly watches the family next door, enthralled by celebrity fashion designer Marianne Taylor and her feted daughter, Aurelle. She wishes she were a 'Taylor girl'. By the summer of 1995, the two girls are at university together, bonded by a mutual desire to escape their wealthy families and personal tragedies and forge new identities. They are closer than lovers, intoxicated by their own bond, falling into the hedonistic seduction of the woods and the water at a remote university that is more summer camp than campus. But when burgeoning artist Diana has a chance at fame, cracks start to appear in their friendship. To what lengths is Diana willing to go to secure her own stardom?



I received a copy of this from the publisher Verve books, and Netgalley in return for an honest review.


This was Tsundoku Squads April read. We were all looking rather forward to reading it, we were going to spread it out over fortnightly chats, but we ended up waiting until the last week and discussing the whole book.


I enjoyed it, and gave it 4 stars in the end. The book moves between the point of view of Diana and Marianne. I liked them both, but equally disliked them too. You’ll get why when you read it. The friendship was so toxic, yet beautiful, and tragic all at once. Their closeness was something else, they do everything together, and it all started kind of by chance. The things they go through, tell each other, and help each other with is the stuff all friendships should be made of. But the underlying jealousy and nastiness creeps its way through, and the story ends so far from where you’d first imagine.


Make sure to check out Em’s group thoughts over on her blog emandherbooks.com


Thanks again to Netgalley, Verve Books, and of course the author Laurie Petrou, for my early review e-book.


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